Understanding the role of ‘peace of mind’ in vaccination

Investigating whether ‘peace of mind’ benefits are a key influence in an individual’s vaccine decision making process
Researchers
Dr Hannah Christensen, Dr Gemma Lasseter, Dr Fran Carroll, Dr Caroline Trotter, Dr Hareth Al-Janabi
Start Date
01 Jun 2017
Category
Prevention
Organisation
University of Bristol, Bristol, UK, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK

Background

Before any health care intervention can be introduced, there has to be evidence that it is cost-effective. For vaccines, this involves counting the net cost of introducing a vaccine, versus the health benefits gained. But current methods for evaluating vaccines are being challenged, because it’s felt that important benefits are being missed.

Early findings from the team’s initial research suggested that people may obtain ‘peace of mind’ from vaccination. Peace of mind can be thought of as the reassurance that one has done everything they can to protect their child. Such factors are not considered in the current framework, which if important, risks putting vaccines at a disadvantage compared to other treatments.

In this study, the researchers will explore more fully the potential ‘peace of mind’ benefits of vaccines.

About the project

The researchers will conduct focus groups with members of the public to address the following questions:  

  • What features influence members of the public to seek vaccinations?
  • Where does vaccination associated ‘peace of mind’ originate from and how does it interact with other personal and social variables?
  • What relative importance do members of the public attribute to vaccination associated ‘peace of mind’?
  • What role does vaccine associated ‘peace of mind’ play within the larger healthcare system?

What will this achieve?

The findings from this research will provide evidence on the various factors which influence vaccination decision making, with particular attention given to ‘peace of mind.’

If results reveal that 'peace of mind' is a key part of an individual's vaccination decision-making process, and results in a real benefit to the recipients, then there may be a case for including such benefits in the evaluation of vaccines, which in turn could have significant policy implications.


This Project is fully funded by a charitable donation from Pfizer Limited.
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