Meningitis Survivor from West Sussex Conquers Mount Kilimanjaro

09 Oct 2017
Meningitis Survivor from West Sussex Conquers Mount Kilimanjaro
Nick Bristow from Storrington has returned from climbing Mount Kilimanjaro to raise funds for Meningitis Research Foundation (MRF) after surviving the disease last year.
 
18 year old Nick who is now studying at university, said, “I didn’t know anything about meningitis, yet in such a short space of time it left a hugely significant impression on me. All I remember is I had a headache, stiff neck, and sickness one Saturday evening in February last year. I was rushed into hospital and was in a coma for 6 days.
 
“Thanks to the quick treatment I received, I pulled through, but I know I was one of the lucky ones. That’s why I chose to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in aid of Meningitis Research Foundation, so they can continue their work to prevent others suffering from this disease, and supporting anyone who is affected.
 
“The trip itself was an amazing experience. It was surreal to feel so far away from normality, but it was run very professionally. Summit night was a particularly challenging point of the trek, as the altitude really caught up with most of us on the climb. However, I was delighted to reach the summit which is 5895 meters high. This was the culmination of my fundraising, with my final total at £3357.88.”
 

Nick Bristow, "Summit night was a particularly challenging point of the trek, as the altitude really caught up with most of us on the climb. However, I was delighted to reach the summit which is 5895 meters high."

Teenagers are a high risk age group for meningitis and septicaemia and university freshers are particularly at risk because they mix with so many other students, some of whom are unknowingly carrying the bacteria.
 
The MenACWY vaccine helps to protect against four different types of meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia - Men A, C, W and Y. Young people up to the age of 20 and university freshers up to age 25 are advised to check their eligibility and get the vaccination whether starting university or not.
 
MRF’s eligibility checker makes it easy for anyone to find out if they are eligible to get the MenACWY vaccine free: www.meningitis.org/oneshot.

The symptoms can be similar to flu but become rapidly worse. Early symptoms are usually fever, vomiting, headache and feeling unwell. Limb pain, pale skin, and cold hands and feet often appear earlier than the rash, neck stiffness, dislike of bright lights and confusion.
 
Rob Dawson, Head of Support at MRF said, “We’re very grateful to Nick for taking on this huge challenge to raise funds. This will help support MRF’s lifesaving research into the prevention, detection and early treatment of meningitis and septicaemia. It will also allow us to continue supporting families affected by these devastating diseases.”
 
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