Hannah Broomhead

England Bacterial meningitis Teen Recovery with After Effects Learning Difficulties
Hannah Broomhead

Growing up I was a very happy child. I had just started pre-school and at the age of 4 was rushed into the local A&E department with meningitis meningococcal septicaemia.

From my parents’ recollection, I started the day feeling unwell and a slight fever however this was expected in the summer’s heat unique to the north west of England. A rash then appeared, however, I became suddenly unconscious and failed to respond.

I was rushed into hospital where it was touch and go for any brain function. After the months in hospital and well wishes of family and friends I regained consciousness and managed to pass water showing I was on the road to recovery.

Following nurses’ visits at home and an IV drip I was feeling a lot better learning to walk, talk, write all from the beginning.

I am now 17 years old and feel I should express my current situation to make you aware of unknown results of this disease.

At the age of 8 I was diagnosed with dyspraxia this affected my co-ordination and balance due to my ‘clumsiness’. Now at 17 I am being assessed for arthritis due to joint pain this affects my mobility greatly.

Two years ago I was going through a hard point in my life of mocks however this was heightened due to lack of concentration and outbursts of emotions. As this worsened I was under CAMHS and later diagnosed with ADHD to which I’m now on medication and passed all my GCSEs with 1 a* 3bs and 3cs - something I wouldn’t have done without help.

"In no way is this experience a weakness of my life just a small part of the journey and what makes me unique."

I am feeling a lot better and going on to the big world. I am very lucky I am here today and I aim to follow my dream of becoming a paediatric nurse. In no way is this experience a weakness of my life just a small part of the journey and what makes me unique.

Please after my experience be aware of the extent of the after effects and the severity of not having follow up checks. I now know this information and the real extent of meningitis. Knowledge is power!

Little is known about meningitis therefore research and professionals need funding in order to help the public gain knowledge and understanding.

Share this
Meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia
Meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia
A major cause of meningitis

Ways you can help

Please do what you can today and help save and change the lives of thousands