700 cases of meningitis prevented by vaccination programme

02 Sep 2019
700 cases of meningitis prevented by vaccination programme

Meningitis Research Foundation (MRF) welcomes the news that researchers at Public Health England (PHE) and St George’s University of London have found that an estimated 700 cases of meningitis have been prevented since pneumococcal vaccines were first introduced to the UK immunisation schedule in 2006.

Pneumococcal meningitis is a deadly disease killing 1 in 6 of those who contract it and leaving 1 in 3 survivors with long term disabilities including hearing loss, brain damage and visual impairment. 

The research studied the impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on meningitis in England and Wales, and found that the childhood vaccination programme has reduced the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease, including meningitis, across all age groups through a combination of direct and herd protection. 

MRF is a leading UK and international charity working to defeat meningitis, raising awareness of the impact that meningitis can have on people of all ages, and the importance of vaccination for preventing the disease. Immunisation saves millions of lives every year and is widely recognised as one of the world’s most successful and cost-effective health interventions. 

"Vaccination is the best way to prevent this deadly disease which strikes healthy people without warning" - Claire Wright, Evidence and Policy Manager at MRF

Claire Wright, Evidence and Policy Manager at MRF said:  “We welcome the news that pneumococcal vaccines have successfully prevented so many cases of meningitis.  Vaccination is the best way to prevent this deadly disease which strikes healthy people without warning and can be difficult to distinguish from other less serious illnesses in the early stages."

“This research highlights how important it is that people take up the vaccines available to them.  However people should also be aware that some types of meningitis are not yet vaccine preventable.  Vaccines that protect against more strains of pneumococcal infection are currently in development and we need these to be made available as soon as possible so even more lives can be saved.”

#VaccinesWork #AfterMeningitis

About meningitis vaccines
About meningitis vaccines
There are vaccines against some forms of meningitis
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Sophie Beyer - Media Relations Manager
Tel: 07875 498047
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