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meningitis & septicaemia can kill in hours!

People who are faced with meningitis and septicaemia have to act fast to help save a life.

Grateful mum tackles half-marathon in aid of Meningitis Research Foundation

Grateful mum tackles half-marathon in aid of Meningitis Research Foundation

17 January 2012

A mother from Hedge End has donned her running shoes in aid of Meningitis Research Foundation.

When Becky Veal, now 32, gave birth to Daisy, a healthy baby girl weighing 9lb 4oz on 16 October 2009, she never imagined what the next few months would hold.

At seven weeks old, Daisy became lifeless, sleepy and had a strange cry. She was admitted to hospital where she was put on IV antibiotics. Tests revealed Daisy had contracted streptococcus pneumonia septicaemia, a type of bacterial pneumococcal meningitis.

Daisy stayed in hospital for a week in isolation waiting for the swelling of her brain to reduce and her temperature to stabilise before allowing her home to continue a further two week course of IV antibiotics by community nurses.

Several tests have shown that there has been mild loss of hearing in her right ear but luckily Daisy has so far developed normal language and speech.

Becky, her sister and brother-in-law, Lizzie and Neil Elshaw are participating in a series of endurance events to raise money in aid of MRF. Their challenge started with the Great South Run in October, the Gosport Half Marathon in November and will end with the completion of the Brighton Half in February and Brighton Marathon in April.

Becky says: “I’m taking part in this challenge as I feel I need to give something back after Daisy was lucky enough to survive. We have a target of raising £1000. Please be generous and sponsor us. Without donations to charities like MRF, which fund so much research into meningitis, Daisy may not have escaped so unscathed.”

Nikki May, Community Fundraising Officer at MRF, says: “My thanks go out to Becky and her family for taking part in such a gruelling challenge in aid of MRF. We rely on voluntary donations to fund our vital work into the prevention, detection and treatment of meningitis and septicaemia, so every bit of support enables us to continue our work.”


Zoe Jeanes
Meningococcal disease
Meningococcal disease at 18 at the time, now 23

I was told if I’d been an hour later, I would be dead.

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