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meningitis & septicaemia can kill in hours!

People who are faced with meningitis and septicaemia have to act fast to help save a life.

A Night at the Museum

A Night at the Museum

19 January 2012

MRF are holding a ball to raise vital funds in the fight against meningitis and septicaemia at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford on Saturday 25th February.

Guests will enjoy a wine reception on arrival whilst browsing amongst the ancient artefacts in the atrium galleries, followed by a contemporary 3 course meal under the watchful gaze of Greek and Roman sculptures and the mummies from the newly opened Egyptology Section. Live music and dancing in the undercroft will round off the evening.

In the UK and Ireland, around 3600 people are affected by meningitis and or septicaemia each year. 1 in 10 victims will die with infants and adolescents particularly susceptible to contracting meningitis. Babies in the first year of life are the most vulnerable, with it killing more UK children under the age of five than any other infectious disease. Of those who contract meningitis and survive, a quarter will be left with a permanent disability and long term effects such as brain damage, amputation or hearing and sight loss.

Jane Murphy from Didcot, who is a Trustee of MRF, knows first-hand how important the work of the charity is after her daughter Ellie contracted Meningococcal Group B in March 2009 at the age of 16 years old. Jane said: “When Ellie contracted meningitis she didn’t have a rash which you usually associate with the disease, she just got a really bad headache that got worse. She was ill for a few days before she was rushed to John Radcliffe Hospital in an ambulance when her temperature went through the roof and we couldn’t rouse her. She was sedated for several days and we were told that she may never wake up and if she did she may be brain damaged. Luckily we got her to hospital before the septicaemia took hold, when she woke she had two strokes from the pressure that was in her brain so we were overjoyed when she recognised us and we found she could still speak to us. Life has changed for Ellie since she contracted the disease. She can no longer cope with stress and her short term memory is extremely poor, her life choices are now limited, which throws up lots of problems, but she is still here with us and feel she has been so lucky compared to many people who get this terrible disease. “

Jane goes on to say: “This ball is going to be fantastic opportunity to support a charity which funds research into meningitis and septicaemia and supports those who have lost loved ones or are left with lifetime after effects.
The venue is amazing so I hope everyone will come and join us for a memorable evening.”

For more details and to buy tickets please contact the Special events team on: 01454 281814 or visit the website: www.meningitis.org/helping-us/fundraising-events/a-night-at-the-museum-56274


Finlay-James Vardy
Meningococcal disease
Meningococcal disease at 7month

Seeing him lying there so helpless and ill was heart-breaking

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