Conference 2007

Conference 2007


Meningitis and Septicaemia in Children and Adults - 7 and 8 November 2007.

Conference downloads

 Full conference programme

Abstracts on all presentations appearing on this page are published in the conference programme.

Presentations by speakers in order.

Day One - Clinical management of meningitis and septicaemia in children and adults

Recognition of the child with sepsis or meningitis in primary and secondary care - a story with a NICE ending?Chair: Professor Michael Levin, Imperial College London

Recognition of meningococcal disease: standard paediatric examination in primary care Dr Nelly Ninis, St Mary's Hospital, London
Early symptoms: 'red flag' symptoms in meningococcal disease vs self-limiting illnesses in primary care and assessment units Dr Matthew Thompson, University of Oxford
Vital signs - can we distinguish meningitis, septicaemia and other serious bacterial infection from self-limiting illness? Dr Roderick MacFaul, Pinderfields Hospital, Wakefield
NICE guideline on feverish illness in children Dr Martin Richardson, Peterborough District Hospital

Epidemiology and treatment
Chair: Professor George Griffin, St George's University of London

Current trends in meningitis and septicaemia in the UK and Europe Dr Mary Ramsay, Health Protection Agency, Centre for Infections, London - Presented by Dr Edward Kaczmarski, Health Protection Agency, Meningococcal Reference Unit, Manchester
Clinical treatment of meningitis: antibiotic choices Professor Robert Heyderman, Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme
Future therapies and clinical management of adult sepsis Professor Jon Cohen, Brighton & Sussex Medical School

Current and future treatment of sepsis and meningitis
Chair: Professor Robert Heyderman, Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme

Potential therapies for childhood meningococcal disease and sepsis Dr Simon Nadel, St Mary's Hospital, London
Clinical management of TB meningitis Dr Guy Thwaites, Imperial College London

Advances from research - prospects for diagnosis and treatment of meningitis and septicaemia
Chair: Professor Chris Tang, Imperial College London

Reducing brain injury in meningitis: neuroprotective strategies, present and future Dr Robert Tasker, Cambridge University School of Clinical Medicine, Addenbrooke's Hospital
Application of new proteomic and genomic tools for diagnosis and treatment of meningitis and septicaemia Professor Michael Levin, Imperial College London

Day Two - Prevention: Public Health, vaccine programmes and development

Satellite breakfast meeting sponsored by Wyeth Vaccines

Evidence based prevention of pneumococcal disease Ros Holingsworth, Wyeth Vaccines
Assembling the evidence and monitoring vaccine input Dr Robert George, HPA Centre for Infections, Colindale

 

Current vaccines
Chair: Dr Edward Kaczmarski, Health Protection Agency, Meningococcal Reference Unit, Manchester

The impact of MeNZBTM in New Zealand Dr Jane O'Hallahan, New Zealand Ministry of Health, Wellington
The UK experience with a reduced pneumococcal conjugate vaccine priming schedule Professor David Goldblatt, Institute of Child Health, London
Prevention of meningococcal disease in the UK: potential for use of quadrivalent or partially protective MenB vaccines Dr Andrew Pollard, University of Oxford

Prospects for defeating meningitis in developing countries
Chair: Dr Orin Levine, GAVI's PneumoADIP, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, USA

Update on epidemiology of the meningitis belt: serogroup X, vaccine shortage Dr William Perea, World Health Oganization
WHO global burden of Hib and pneumococcal disease in children Dr Kate O'Brien, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, USA
Update of progress on a conjugate MenA vaccine for Africa Dr Simonetta Viviani, Meningitis Vaccine Project, Ferney-Voltaire, France

Future prevention of pneumococcal disease
Chair: Professor Adam Finn, University of Bristol

Progress on a new 10V pneumococcal/Haemophilus influenzae vaccine Dr William Hausdorff, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals
Progress on a new 13V pneumococcal conjugate vaccine Dr Susan Tansey, Wyeth Vaccines Research
Back to the future? A whole cell killed pneumococcal vaccine Dr Richard Malley, Children's Hospital Boston, USA
T cell immunity to whole cell killed pneumococcal vaccine Professor Adam Finn, University of Bristol
Common pneumococcal proteins as candidate vaccine antigens Dr Jan Poolman, Bacterial Vaccine Research and Development, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals

Outlook for prevention of Group B meningococcal disease
Chair: Dr Andrew Pollard, University of Oxford

Overview of progress on MenB vaccines and correlates of protection Dr Ray Borrow, Health Protection Agency, Vaccine Evaluation Unit, Manchester
Prospects for prevention of MenB with a Neisseria lactamica -based vaccine Dr Andrew Gorringe, Health ProtectionAgency, Salisbury
Advances in MenB vaccine development: an update Professor Rino Rappuoli, Novartis Vaccines presented by Phillip Oster, Novartis Vaccines
Kirsty Lawson
Meningococcal disease
Meningococcal disease at 21

I soon realised that most of my symptoms were pointing to meningitis.

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