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meningitis & septicaemia can kill in hours!

People who are faced with meningitis and septicaemia have to act fast to help save a life.

Kirsty Leigh Woodhouse

Pneumococcal meningitis at 18

Pneumococcal meningitis

I was diagnosed with pneumococccal meningitis as a toddler, secondary to pneumococccal meningitis I was diagnosed with septicemia. This was after my mother taking me to the doctors because of my lack of wanting to be handled and my inability to hold food down.

I was in Intensive Care (ICU) for months, and was given 10% chance of pulling through these conditions. My mother was unable to care for me at this point and I was under an inventive 24/7 watch. My only relatives lived in Australia, they flew out the day I was diagnosed fearing the worst possible news.

Since I was discharged from hospital (seven months after being admitted), there have been many ups and downs in my life. I was left with severe seizures which they believed at the time was epilepsy, hearing problems, Learning difficulties (Dyslexia), speech problems (which I received speech and language therapy for) Co-ordination problems (diagnosed with dyspraxia in 2000), asthma and arthritis in my left wrist and both my knees.

However, despite my medical complaints I have tried my best to power on with every possible situation. I am currently studying to going to university in September this year to study physiotherapy, and I currently ride at a regional level for my pony club.

I am a keen fundraiser for meningitis charities, as I personally know how much lives can be affected by this medical condition. Having meningitis myself and experiencing the problems associated with it, I've prided myself with the ability to make the most out of what life gives you and carry on.

JUNE 2012

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