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meningitis & septicaemia can kill in hours!

People who are faced with meningitis and septicaemia have to act fast to help save a life.

Edward Bright

Meningococcal disease at 7

Meningococcal disease

February 2001, and William aged 13 months is in HDU with meningococcal septicaemia. He is very lucky and is discharged six days later with no after effects.

Move forward nearly six years to the day and Edward (William's identical twin) wakes up in the night feeling quite poorly. He wakes his big brother (18 year old Adam) who sits with him a while and soothes him.

The next morning I went into Edward and he said he had been sick and his feet hurt. Having already experienced meningitis I asked Edward to put his chin on his chest and when I asked him if that hurt he said no.

I then asked him to look through the window and again asked if that hurt his eyes, he said no. I assumed it was just a bug.

One hour or so later Edward has blotches mixed with a purplish rash; I called the emergency ambulance who arrived within ten or so minutes and immediately administered antibiotics and got him off to the local hospital.

Edward deteriorated over the afternoon and at midnight he was ventilated and transferred to Glenfield. After 48 hours he was transferred to Leicester Royal Infirmary for bilateral leg amputations.

He remained ventilated for two weeks and was then transferred to Birmingham Children's Hospital, where he had bilateral forearm amputations.

Edward is now two years post-op and he is a very lively, active nine-year-old who is an inspiration to all who meet him.

CLARE BRIGHT
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