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meningitis & septicaemia can kill in hours!

People who are faced with meningitis and septicaemia have to act fast to help save a life.

Meningitis Statistics?

1 comment

Posted by Michael Rowe on 29 March 2011

I preface technical lectures that I give to my professional Institution (The IET) by warnings about meningitis using the example of a young lady from near my home who died 2 days after contracting it. Students, parents and grand-parents normally in audence. So far as I know, I am the only engineer who does this. Does anyone have statistics available for deaths (student and general public) in University towns, especially Bristol, Bath, Exeter and Plymouth? Always useful to qote real numbers!

1 comment

Posted on 29 March 2011

Comment by Claire Wright MRF Medical Information Officer

It’s great to hear that you are raising awareness of meningitis amongst students. Meningitis and septicaemia can affect anyone of any age, but under-fives and young adults are most at risk.

Statistics regarding the incidence of meningitis are available from:
http://www.hpa.org.uk/Topics/InfectiousDiseases/InfectionsAZ/NotificationsOfInfectiousDiseases/NOIDSReportsAndTables/NoidsAnnualReports/

At the above website you can download annual reports which look at the number of cases of meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia reported on a regional basis (unfortunately the data is not split into towns).
In 2009 the NOIDs data (available from the above link) reported that there were 1646 cases of bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia in England and Wales (this data is likely to be an underestimation of the true number however due to under reporting). 11% of these 1646 cases were in the 15-24 age group.

Death statistics are available from http://www.statistics.gov.uk/statbase/Product.asp?vlnk=14409. In 2009 there were 161 deaths due to meningitis (other than that caused by meningococcal infection) amongst all ages in England and Wales and 60 deaths due to meningococcal infection. These statistics are not further split down into geographical regions however. It is also worth noting that 25% of people who survive an initial diagnosis of meningitis and septicaemia will live with life-altering after-effects. These can be as disabling as limb loss, deafness, blindness, cerebral palsy, quadriplegia and severe mental impairment. We estimate there may be more than 60,000 people living with varying levels of disability due to meningitis and septicaemia.

Meningitis Research Foundation has a range of educational resources available to individuals who wish to raise awareness of meningitis and septicaemia including awareness power point presentations which we would be happy to send you if requested (please contact info@meningitis.org). Much of our awareness and educational literature is downloadable from here. Hard copies of this literature are also available free of charge and can be ordered here.

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